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20130101
20130101
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
, kick it off. your big story of the year. >> kimberly: i thought it was the superstorm sandy. specifically, when we had the little bear hug where christie, game changer for the election, where christie went and embraced obama. that was a big deal. he was the main people surrogate for romney campaigning in the election for him to validate and say hey, this guy is doing a great job. didn't help days before the election. >> eric: big story. sandy. christie. two big stories. >> kimberly: yes. >> eric: juan, what about you, sir? actually i don't think there is any -- >> juan: i don't think there is any question. the big story of the year was the election. the big story here is the change in the way technology, media treats an election. i remember the debate. the first debate. won by romney. the way i was looking at it. obama is not doing bad. not doing great but basically you got to knock out the champ to beat him. it didn't see a knock-out. all my friends like sean hannity, i sit next two on twitter and they're scoring the debate minute by minute, everything going on in social me
stories of 2012, superstorm sandy. long island, new york city and nerming new jersey all braced for the -- and new jersey braced for the storm, but nobody could have predicted sandy's immense devastation. and new information on the head injury of secretary of state hillary clinton. what she is battling. coming up, what her health crisis could mean for her political future. >>> welcome back. 2012 was a brutal year for weather in the u.s. mother natured tested in every conceivable way. janice dean takes a look now at the wild weather year that was 2012. >> 2012 has more than its fair share of wild weather. whether it was destructive, deadly or just plain hot, extreme weather affected americans in every part of the country. after a mild winter for most, spring roared in with tornadoes. twisters tore through several states wiping out communities and killing several people. a devastating ef4 tornado with winds up to 200 miles per hour hit the midwest. henryville and maryville completely obliterated. heartbreaking stories of families ripped apart like this tragic case of angel babcock
as well as andrew ross sorkin. sup superstorm sandy climate change. >> that made that an impact on the last week of the election as well. >> i think so, joe. what happened after sandy, during sandy, to the lives of so many people on long island and new jersey, elsewhere, in an odd way is tied into the topic of 47% remark mitt romney made. a campaign -- in my memory, i can't recall a campaign so staggeri staggeringly incompetent at the level of responding to things. months went by and before it was released, the 47% comment was released, i can't get over the fact the campaign was so in competent they ran for months without any knowledge or attachment to the emotional lives of voters. what happened with bain and attacks on bain and thus on romney is that people make links, emotional link, bain, they took the factory and someone else took my house. other forces are taking my children's futures. when sandy occurs, that's part of it, you know, my house is gone. part of my life is gone. >> you're right. >> the emotional lives of voters they completely missed. >> did they run this in a
by superstorm sandy where recovery continues at a slow pace. >> suarez: we talk with journalist and author claudia kolker about her research into the "immigrant advantage." it's still without electricity, gas, sewers or water. and we continue our conversations with new members of the 113th congress. tonight the senator-elect from nebraska, republican deb fischer. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: this turned out to be a long day of waiting for final action on the "fiscal cliff" bill that cleared the senate early today. in the house, the measure ran into republican de
. there was a family flooded out by superstorm sandy, even one of our abc producers helped drive them to safety. their house was flooded so badly, they could not go back home. abc's ron claiborne has this incredible story. >> reporter: in the storm ravaged town of long beach, long island, on the day after hurricane sandy, we met barbara burns standing on the front porch of the house she called home for the past 48 years, the house had five feet of floodwater in it and, worse, 100 gallons of home heating oil stored in her garage had spilled into the water. she wanted to go to a shelter but her family had no way to go anywhere. almost every car in town had been damaged by the flood. so we gave them a ride. she, her daughter maureen, her two grandchildren and mccleary, the family dog, all squeezed in with a few possessions they could grab in a hurry. producer john s achlsantucci dr them to city hall where they caught a bus to the sheller. that's the last time we saw them until a few days ago when we met mrs. burn and maureen again at their little house on connecticut avenue. >> i really feel like
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)